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National Register of Historic Places in San Francisco

National Register #08000086: Torpedo Storehouse on Yerba Buena Island
1998 Photograph
From Historic American Buildings Survey
(Click Photo to Zoom)

Building 262 is located near the eastern span of the San Francisco Bay Bridge. The eastern span, a cantilever bridge spanning San Francisco Bay from Oakland to Yerba Buena Island, was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake The cantilever bridge is being replace by single-towered, self-anchored suspension span which will pass directly over the Torpedo Storehouse.

National Register #08000086
Torpedo Storehouse
Building 262
Yerba Buena Island
Built 1891

The Army built this facility, the oldest surviving structure on Yerba Buena Island, to assemble and store floating mines which they called torpedoes. These would be placed into the Bay via cable if needed for defense. The Torpedo Station was abandoned in the 1930s. (Source: California Department of Transportation)

Building 262 has been determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places at the state level of significance under Criteria A and C, in the areas of military history and architecture. Its period of significance extends from 1891 through 1960. The Torpedo Assembly Building is the only extant building that signifies and commemorates nearly a half-century of Army presence on this Island. The building is also significant as a very early reinforced concrete building and as the "work of a Master," Earnest L. Ransome, who was among the most important 19th century reinforced concrete engineers working in the United States. He designed the first reinforced concrete bridge in the world, the Alvord Lake Bridge in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. The building is also highly significant because it is almost completely unmodified. The reinforced concrete walls and their patented ashlar-like appearance, and minor elements, such as the windows and interior railroad tracks still exist. (Source: Historic American Buildings Survey)

Points of interest on Yerba Buena Island and Treasure Island:
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